Five of the Most Popular Architectural Styles from Years Past

Five of the Most Popular Architectural Styles from Years Past

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There are a number of architectural styles used in the United States for designing houses. Many of them originated from decades past while others can be dated back nearly 400 years ago. Homebuilders still use these designs today; some having seen an upswing in use in recent years. Here are five of the most popular styles that Americans are going back to.

Ranch

Probably the most common style of home in older American suburbs. The popularity of this style home extended from the 1940s all the way through to the 1970s and early 80s. They are typically one-story and are low to the ground. The TV families of the 60s and 1970s tended to live in this style of home. The Ranch design is seeing a revival thanks to the younger generation’s desire for this style of home.

The exteriors will usually be of brick or wood materials, or plastic siding for more modern homes. They are low-lying homes with newer-build houses having a garage built on to it. Sometimes these will be built in the shape of an L depending on lot sizes.

Colonial

Colonial homes are very reminiscent of the early days of America; of the 1600-1700s. Wide fronts with a triangular overhang above the front door, with columns supporting it, were typical of this style of architecture. The focus in this style was on symmetry; equal number of rooms on either side of the house, equal amount of space between windows and shutters, and equal number of chimneys. They were typically build with two stories, although more were possible.

These were popular for a long time, up into the 1940s. The style is still preferred in New England where the Colonial design originated from.

Craftsman

The Craftsman design is also seeing a recent rejuvenation. Approximately 43% of home buyers prefer this style when looking for a new home. Its original popularity ran from the late 1800s into the 1930s.

The focus here is in the use of natural woods and bricks in its construction. More than just an architectural design. The Arts and Crafts movement from which the design emerged also incorporates interior and landscaping design in and around the house. They are usually two stories and squarish in shape. The back would have a section built outward, creating a second entry into the home. This area could sometimes be used as a breakfast nook for more intimate meals.

Cape Cod

The Cape Cod design are asymmetrical and consist of steeped roofs, nooks on one end of the house (this can switch between the front of the house or the back depending on who the home builder is), and multi-paned windows. They resemble the British cottages of the 1600s and can be built with a single level or as a two-storied home.

The design is still in use in areas of the American Northeast, especially in Massachusetts where this architectural style originated from.

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Victorian

Although this style of house is often featured in older horror movies where the creepy ghost or the murderer resides, this was the popular style from the 1830s to the early 20th Century. Victorians are still preferred in scattered sections of the United States, such as in San Fransisco, Utah, and parts of Louisiana.

They are multi-storied houses with 3 or 4 levels to them, extremely asymmetrical, and loaded with windows of all shapes and sizes. Porches on these homes tend to wrap around the entirety of the front of the house, sometimes reaching to the back. Numerous columns hold up the porch roof while fencing fills the space between the supports.

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